There’s A New Justice Headed to Town

With the recent nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court, the left has predictably lost its mind.  Justice Anthony Kennedy’s retirement announcement struck an ugly chord with the self-appointed defenders of civil liberties—at least those that enshrine the rights of infanticide, sodomy, and religious censorship.  It didn’t matter who Trump was willing to nominate, since after Gorsuch’s nomination, it was clear that Trump wasn’t the left wing New York liberal that his neocon detractors had predicted.  The left was going to protest anyone. Continue reading “There’s A New Justice Headed to Town”

How to Hijack Conservatism 101

At one time, the term “neocon” referred to a specific group of presumably-reformed Trotskyites who had migrated away from the anti-Stalinist left.  They had found dissatisfaction with the way the conflict in Vietnam was being handled in the 1960s, and using the Cold War as an impetus, sought to limit the expansion of the Soviet regime through extremely active foreign involvement.  This involvement could have taken the form of minor espionage operations, but don’t be fooled: the neocons of the time were no strangers to advocating for the intervention of foreign affairs with the full might of the United States military. Continue reading “How to Hijack Conservatism 101”

The Cosmological Proof: A Quick Rundown

While writing the review for Ed Feser’s Five Proofs of the Existence of God, I decided to cut out a large segment I had written concerning the Kalam cosmological argument and its relationship with Aristotle’s First Cause argument.  Feser doesn’t spend much time on the Kalam argument save to mention it briefly in the last chapter of his book, and even then, he spends no time focusing on it.  Since most of what I’ll be discussing here only uses Feser’s book as a jumping-off point, I decided to split it off and make it a post of its own. Continue reading “The Cosmological Proof: A Quick Rundown”

Five Proofs of the Existence of God – Edward Feser (Ignatius Press, 2017)

2017 was a busy year for Edward Feser, having two hot publications drop within six months of each other.  One of them he co-wrote with Joseph M. Bessette on the topic of a Catholic defense of capital punishment, By Man Shall His Blood Be Shed, which I plan on reviewing later this summer.  The other, Five Proofs of the Existence of God, has turned out to be one of the best books of its kind in the field of popular apologetics.  It brings together into one place all of the work in apologetics and metaphysics that Feser has written about before—particularly in The Last Superstition and in various places of Scholastic Metaphysics and Aquinas—while also adding to his repertoire more fleshed out versions of proofs he had hitherto only briefly touched upon in passing. Continue reading “Five Proofs of the Existence of God – Edward Feser (Ignatius Press, 2017)”

Don’t Stare. Don’t Blink.

Imagine having a company policy about how long you’re allowed to look at someone.  Just think about that.  Maybe you have a few guys here or there that like to stare when that coworker of yours comes in wearing a skirt that’s a size too small for her.  Or maybe you have those socially awkward men with have intense gazes who never break eye-contact when they’re speaking.  Or maybe you have employees that actually look at people when they start talking.  Well, I hope you enjoyed it while it lasted!  Welcome to #metoo! Continue reading “Don’t Stare. Don’t Blink.”

REVIEW: On Grand Strategy – John Lewis Gaddis (Penguin Press, 2018)

Books on strategy comprise a gargantuan field of popular reading.  The stuff of ancient conquests and military theory can certainly be interesting when handled by the right author, and it’s a pretty well-established meme to use military tactical and strategic advice as metaphors for deploying one’s skills in the business world.  It stands to reason, then, that a book on strategy seeking popular sticking-power would need at least two of the following: interesting subject matter, astute and insightful explanation, and easily readable narration. Continue reading “REVIEW: On Grand Strategy – John Lewis Gaddis (Penguin Press, 2018)”

The Incongruence of Jordan Peterson

Over the past few weeks, information on the acclaimed Jordan Peterson has come to light, and most of that information is pretty damning stuff.  He’s no darling of the right wing, his philosophical approach is more like that of a cult leader, and he seems to be in bed with some extremely questionable globalist characters and has been for some time.  As of this post, the jury is out as to the extent of his controlled opposition—whether he’s legitimately backed by the same globalists who, say, backed Hillary Clinton’s campaign, or if he’s just an unwitting professor whose strings are easily pulled into barking up all the wrong trees.  But the substance of what he’s saying in his books isn’t up for debate.  He put it all out there for the world to see and, hopefully, laugh at. Continue reading “The Incongruence of Jordan Peterson”

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