Against Pride and Against Pride Month

Five years ago, the monumental Obergefell v Hodges case reached its narrow decision, mandating the federal recognition of marriage documents drawn up for pairs of same-sex people engaged in allegedly romantic relationships. Most of us should remember it pretty well. Those that supported it took to the streets waving rainbow flags and loudly proclaiming the message of the sexual revolution: free love, free expression, no consequences, love whom you like. Some of us spent time pouring over the statements by the Justices to see how badly-reasoned the five supporting decisions were. And the rest of the country, more or less ambivalent and ignorant, shrugged their shoulders and acquiesced to the loud mob. Hey, they reasoned, what the gays do in their bedrooms up to them, and if they want to lick the boots of the IRS by getting saddled with the income tax adjustments that come with marriage, they ought to go right ahead. Continue reading “Against Pride and Against Pride Month”

REVIEW: Jordanetics – Vox Day (Castalia House, 2018)

When a professor of psychology at a state-funded university skyrockets into popularity by publicly denouncing a national policy regarding preferred pronouns, he does what most of us would presume to be is career suicide. Even tenured professors have felt the heat from the ardent defenders of political correctness, perhaps even more so now than when Jordan Peterson went viral a few years ago. And in his apparently firm, resolute denunciation, he seemed to be standing on all the same values that commentators just to the right of center have been advocating for in the US for years: liberty, individualism, free speech, et cetera. Continue reading “REVIEW: Jordanetics – Vox Day (Castalia House, 2018)”

“Know Thyself.”

These words mark the beginning of practical philosophy—practical reason—which is more often recognized by its more common name: the study of morality. They also probably don the front pages of every self-help book ever written, as they mark what most assume to be the beginning of self-knowledge.

What exactly is self knowledge, though? Is it a perfect understanding of one’s own actions? Of the causes of those actions? The thoughts? Is it exact harmony between one’s thoughts, intentions, motivations, and behavior? If it is any or all of these things, how can it be attained? Continue reading ““Know Thyself.””

Let’s Not Abolish the Priesthood

Last week, The Atlantic published a cover story for its June 2019 edition written by James Carroll, an ex-priest of Boomer age with, apparently, a very confused sense of Catholicism. Entitled “Abolish the Priesthood” by whatever flamboyant editor ran with the article, it is one of the best examples of confused Spirit-of-Vatican-II nonsense I’ve read in recent memory. Selective, arbitrary, arrogant, and self-indulgent, Carroll’s diatribe comes across as a man eagerly pushing an agenda on grounds so obviously erroneous that his audience could only be found perusing the pages of The Atlantic. Continue reading “Let’s Not Abolish the Priesthood”

A Mediocre Sense of Evil

This was intended to be a shorter post for the week, as projects and research have taken up most of my time, but it turned out to be about the usual length. Watching the meltdown over the past week over two barely-related topics made me really think about the timing of their breaking: Game of Thrones approaching its humorously absurd conclusion, and the state of Alabama passing what is the strictest American anti-abortion law in living memory. Continue reading “A Mediocre Sense of Evil”

A Reactionary Cosmology

Like most young reactionaries who survived the public school system and years of university, there comes a point where you question just about everything you were ever taught by a figure of authority. You don’t quite figure out that literally every single thing you ever learned in those institutions was wrong, but that’s only because those institutions had to teach you how to read, write, and add numbers together. Everything else, however, falls under suspicion. Continue reading “A Reactionary Cosmology”

Spotlight: Sayings of the Desert Fathers

When someone utters the term “Christian monasticism,” the Western mind probably conjures up images of dimly-lit temples and Gothic architecture, candles illuminating monks in brown robes as they transcribe ancient texts into medieval tomes, Gregorian chants, and the occasional pillaging and burning by Vikings. While this describes an important aspect of Catholic monasticism during the middle ages, the Christian tradition monks serving God in secluded hermitages extends as far back as at least the third century, beginning in the Egyptian desert west of the Nile and some ways northwest of Memphis. The establishment of Nitria, Kellia, and perhaps most noteworthy, Scetis, marked the beginning of Christian asceticism that, in various forms, has endured even into today. Continue reading “Spotlight: Sayings of the Desert Fathers”

“It’s Not Up to Me.”

“Well, that’s just your opinion, man. We’ll juts have to agree to disagree.”

Sure. We can agree to disagree on the indisputable fact that mayonnaise has no business being on a hamburger. We can agree to disagree that driving a stick shift makes for a more pleasant experience when outside of major cities. We can even agree to disagree over whether Natalie Portman was more attractive in Attack of the Clones than Carrie Fischer was in The Return of the Jedi. Continue reading ““It’s Not Up to Me.””

REVIEW: The Blessed Sacrament Prayer Book of Father Lasance

Last week, we looked at the recently reprinted missal of the Latin Mass that was put together back in 1945 by Fr. Francis Xavier Lasance. I hope to do a post at some point in the future on the life of Fr. Lasance, but for now, we’ll continue reviewing some of his works readily available in English. Today, we’re looking at the largest prayer book he ever assembled, which came to be known as his Blessed Sacrament Prayer Book. Continue reading “REVIEW: The Blessed Sacrament Prayer Book of Father Lasance”

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