REVIEW: On Grand Strategy – John Lewis Gaddis (Penguin Press, 2018)

Books on strategy comprise a gargantuan field of popular reading.  The stuff of ancient conquests and military theory can certainly be interesting when handled by the right author, and it’s a pretty well-established meme to use military tactical and strategic advice as metaphors for deploying one’s skills in the business world.  It stands to reason, then, that a book on strategy seeking popular sticking-power would need at least two of the following: interesting subject matter, astute and insightful explanation, and easily readable narration. Continue reading “REVIEW: On Grand Strategy – John Lewis Gaddis (Penguin Press, 2018)”

The Incongruence of Jordan Peterson

Over the past few weeks, information on the acclaimed Jordan Peterson has come to light, and most of that information is pretty damning stuff.  He’s no darling of the right wing, his philosophical approach is more like that of a cult leader, and he seems to be in bed with some extremely questionable globalist characters and has been for some time.  As of this post, the jury is out as to the extent of his controlled opposition—whether he’s legitimately backed by the same globalists who, say, backed Hillary Clinton’s campaign, or if he’s just an unwitting professor whose strings are easily pulled into barking up all the wrong trees.  But the substance of what he’s saying in his books isn’t up for debate.  He put it all out there for the world to see and, hopefully, laugh at. Continue reading “The Incongruence of Jordan Peterson”

REVIEW: Why Liberalism Failed – Patrick J. Deneen (Yale University Press, 2018)

It doesn’t take a genius to note the decrepit state of modernity (take, for example, this blog).  About as cliché, although slightly more respected, is the growing state of contemporary academia to take aim at liberalism—and not merely the liberalism of the clueless BernieBro bumper stickers and effete Starbucks-intoxicated opinions on veganism, but the legitimate roots of liberalism as characterized by Locke, Mill, Rousseau, and the rest.  The so-called classical liberalism of the nineteenth century, the brand contemporary ‘conservatives’ claim to embrace so well, is undergoing a well-deserved attack by what remains of the academic right. Continue reading “REVIEW: Why Liberalism Failed – Patrick J. Deneen (Yale University Press, 2018)”

REVIEW: SJWs Always Double Down – Vox Day (Castelia House, 2017)

Rewind for a second.  It’s 2016 again.  Donald Trump is allegedly in last-place during the Republican primaries.  Google has been accused, though as of yet no evidence has actually come forward that would convince the Left, of being so compromised by SJWs that they’re censoring and omitting search results with their engine.  Facebook, also, has been accused of burying conservative articles in the newsfeed.  Twitter’s been kicking people off their platform.  But so far, the fact that nearly every relevant person of interest who has been censored, de-platformed, or buried under cat videos and Buzzfeed drivel has been center-right or right-leaning is just, as they claim, a narrative.  They insist: there’s nothing there.  We all remember that year, and we also remember the vindication that came the following year: there was not only something there, there was a whole shitstorm there. Continue reading “REVIEW: SJWs Always Double Down – Vox Day (Castelia House, 2017)”

A Supermodel Frankenstein: Max Richter’s Recomposition of Vivaldi

The flighty repetition of a flurry of violins and winds, blurring all together like the flutter of a sea of birds taking flight, simplifying and calming into one, then two, then three distinguished staccato violins chirping along—this is how it starts, the beginning of Spring, whose warm harmonic line swells and ebbs beneath the frolicking violins.  I speak of Max Richter’s recomposition of Vivaldi’s great Four Seasons, the original of course possessing some of the most famous opening bars of baroque music ever composed.  Continue reading “A Supermodel Frankenstein: Max Richter’s Recomposition of Vivaldi”

The Last Jedi is a Failure, Part 5 – The Mouse Is Hungry

This has been an overlong analysis, but now it finally pays off.  What was the purpose of this film?  Why was it actually made, and why was it made so seemingly incompetently?  What did Disney hope to gain from it all?  Was it just a marketing endeavor?  Was the virtue signalling just the cherry on top?  Not exactly.  The Mouse is a bit more sinister than that. Continue reading “The Last Jedi is a Failure, Part 5 – The Mouse Is Hungry”

The Last Jedi is a Failure, Part 4 – The Moron with a Thousand Faces

George Lucas somewhat autistically based his original Star Wars storyline on a well-known piece of pop-critique by Joseph Campbell, with Luke Skywalker being the locus of the action and ultimate hero of the saga.  He’s a little dimwitted but ultimately good, and he rises to becoming great, in every sense of the word.  Unfortunately, The Last Jedi was written by people who spent more time learning about postmodern subversion techniques by frequenting fanfiction websites than they did studying literature or mythologies, so instead of Luke having matured into a wise old mentor figure, we’re left with this retarded Diogenes knock-off who’s apparently a moron. Continue reading “The Last Jedi is a Failure, Part 4 – The Moron with a Thousand Faces”

The Last Jedi Is a Failure, Part 3 – The Return of Zutara Fanfiction

A dashing, psychologically unbalanced, absurdly talented villain begins spending time with a pretty, talented young girl with a savior complex.  They go together like fire and water!  That’s right, Star Wars: The Last Jedi was written by a bunch of emotionally stunted and middle-aged Avatar: The Last Airbender fans with deviantart accounts.  And it shows. Continue reading “The Last Jedi Is a Failure, Part 3 – The Return of Zutara Fanfiction”

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