REVIEW: Infiltration – Dr. Taylor Marshall (Sophia Institute Press, 2019)

It’s not often that I come across a book with about two-hundred fifty pages of content that includes an index and fifty pages of appendices, but that’s what I found I’d ordered when Dr. Taylor Marshall’s Infiltration arrived in the mail last week. It’s a short and very easily-read book, taking only about an afternoon and some change to read through from cover to cover, yet in it, Marshall attempts to tackle the history of the liturgical subversion so rampant in the Church today. Continue reading “REVIEW: Infiltration – Dr. Taylor Marshall (Sophia Institute Press, 2019)”

REVIEW: Jordanetics – Vox Day (Castalia House, 2018)

When a professor of psychology at a state-funded university skyrockets into popularity by publicly denouncing a national policy regarding preferred pronouns, he does what most of us would presume to be is career suicide. Even tenured professors have felt the heat from the ardent defenders of political correctness, perhaps even more so now than when Jordan Peterson went viral a few years ago. And in his apparently firm, resolute denunciation, he seemed to be standing on all the same values that commentators just to the right of center have been advocating for in the US for years: liberty, individualism, free speech, et cetera. Continue reading “REVIEW: Jordanetics – Vox Day (Castalia House, 2018)”

Spotlight: Sayings of the Desert Fathers

When someone utters the term “Christian monasticism,” the Western mind probably conjures up images of dimly-lit temples and Gothic architecture, candles illuminating monks in brown robes as they transcribe ancient texts into medieval tomes, Gregorian chants, and the occasional pillaging and burning by Vikings. While this describes an important aspect of Catholic monasticism during the middle ages, the Christian tradition monks serving God in secluded hermitages extends as far back as at least the third century, beginning in the Egyptian desert west of the Nile and some ways northwest of Memphis. The establishment of Nitria, Kellia, and perhaps most noteworthy, Scetis, marked the beginning of Christian asceticism that, in various forms, has endured even into today. Continue reading “Spotlight: Sayings of the Desert Fathers”

REVIEW: The Blessed Sacrament Prayer Book of Father Lasance

Last week, we looked at the recently reprinted missal of the Latin Mass that was put together back in 1945 by Fr. Francis Xavier Lasance. I hope to do a post at some point in the future on the life of Fr. Lasance, but for now, we’ll continue reviewing some of his works readily available in English. Today, we’re looking at the largest prayer book he ever assembled, which came to be known as his Blessed Sacrament Prayer Book. Continue reading “REVIEW: The Blessed Sacrament Prayer Book of Father Lasance”

REVIEW: On Grand Strategy – John Lewis Gaddis (Penguin Press, 2018)

Books on strategy comprise a gargantuan field of popular reading.  The stuff of ancient conquests and military theory can certainly be interesting when handled by the right author, and it’s a pretty well-established meme to use military tactical and strategic advice as metaphors for deploying one’s skills in the business world.  It stands to reason, then, that a book on strategy seeking popular sticking-power would need at least two of the following: interesting subject matter, astute and insightful explanation, and easily readable narration. Continue reading “REVIEW: On Grand Strategy – John Lewis Gaddis (Penguin Press, 2018)”

The Incongruence of Jordan Peterson

Over the past few weeks, information on the acclaimed Jordan Peterson has come to light, and most of that information is pretty damning stuff.  He’s no darling of the right wing, his philosophical approach is more like that of a cult leader, and he seems to be in bed with some extremely questionable globalist characters and has been for some time.  As of this post, the jury is out as to the extent of his controlled opposition—whether he’s legitimately backed by the same globalists who, say, backed Hillary Clinton’s campaign, or if he’s just an unwitting professor whose strings are easily pulled into barking up all the wrong trees.  But the substance of what he’s saying in his books isn’t up for debate.  He put it all out there for the world to see and, hopefully, laugh at. Continue reading “The Incongruence of Jordan Peterson”

REVIEW: Why Liberalism Failed – Patrick J. Deneen (Yale University Press, 2018)

It doesn’t take a genius to note the decrepit state of modernity (take, for example, this blog).  About as cliché, although slightly more respected, is the growing state of contemporary academia to take aim at liberalism—and not merely the liberalism of the clueless BernieBro bumper stickers and effete Starbucks-intoxicated opinions on veganism, but the legitimate roots of liberalism as characterized by Locke, Mill, Rousseau, and the rest.  The so-called classical liberalism of the nineteenth century, the brand contemporary ‘conservatives’ claim to embrace so well, is undergoing a well-deserved attack by what remains of the academic right. Continue reading “REVIEW: Why Liberalism Failed – Patrick J. Deneen (Yale University Press, 2018)”

REVIEW: SJWs Always Double Down – Vox Day (Castelia House, 2017)

Rewind for a second.  It’s 2016 again.  Donald Trump is allegedly in last-place during the Republican primaries.  Google has been accused, though as of yet no evidence has actually come forward that would convince the Left, of being so compromised by SJWs that they’re censoring and omitting search results with their engine.  Facebook, also, has been accused of burying conservative articles in the newsfeed.  Twitter’s been kicking people off their platform.  But so far, the fact that nearly every relevant person of interest who has been censored, de-platformed, or buried under cat videos and Buzzfeed drivel has been center-right or right-leaning is just, as they claim, a narrative.  They insist: there’s nothing there.  We all remember that year, and we also remember the vindication that came the following year: there was not only something there, there was a whole shitstorm there. Continue reading “REVIEW: SJWs Always Double Down – Vox Day (Castelia House, 2017)”

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