REVIEW: On Grand Strategy – John Lewis Gaddis (Penguin Press, 2018)

Books on strategy comprise a gargantuan field of popular reading.  The stuff of ancient conquests and military theory can certainly be interesting when handled by the right author, and it’s a pretty well-established meme to use military tactical and strategic advice as metaphors for deploying one’s skills in the business world.  It stands to reason, then, that a book on strategy seeking popular sticking-power would need at least two of the following: interesting subject matter, astute and insightful explanation, and easily readable narration. Continue reading “REVIEW: On Grand Strategy – John Lewis Gaddis (Penguin Press, 2018)”

The Incongruence of Jordan Peterson

Over the past few weeks, information on the acclaimed Jordan Peterson has come to light, and most of that information is pretty damning stuff.  He’s no darling of the right wing, his philosophical approach is more like that of a cult leader, and he seems to be in bed with some extremely questionable globalist characters and has been for some time.  As of this post, the jury is out as to the extent of his controlled opposition—whether he’s legitimately backed by the same globalists who, say, backed Hillary Clinton’s campaign, or if he’s just an unwitting professor whose strings are easily pulled into barking up all the wrong trees.  But the substance of what he’s saying in his books isn’t up for debate.  He put it all out there for the world to see and, hopefully, laugh at. Continue reading “The Incongruence of Jordan Peterson”

REVIEW: Why Liberalism Failed – Patrick J. Deneen (Yale University Press, 2018)

It doesn’t take a genius to note the decrepit state of modernity (take, for example, this blog).  About as cliché, although slightly more respected, is the growing state of contemporary academia to take aim at liberalism—and not merely the liberalism of the clueless BernieBro bumper stickers and effete Starbucks-intoxicated opinions on veganism, but the legitimate roots of liberalism as characterized by Locke, Mill, Rousseau, and the rest.  The so-called classical liberalism of the nineteenth century, the brand contemporary ‘conservatives’ claim to embrace so well, is undergoing a well-deserved attack by what remains of the academic right. Continue reading “REVIEW: Why Liberalism Failed – Patrick J. Deneen (Yale University Press, 2018)”

REVIEW: SJWs Always Double Down – Vox Day (Castelia House, 2017)

Rewind for a second.  It’s 2016 again.  Donald Trump is allegedly in last-place during the Republican primaries.  Google has been accused, though as of yet no evidence has actually come forward that would convince the Left, of being so compromised by SJWs that they’re censoring and omitting search results with their engine.  Facebook, also, has been accused of burying conservative articles in the newsfeed.  Twitter’s been kicking people off their platform.  But so far, the fact that nearly every relevant person of interest who has been censored, de-platformed, or buried under cat videos and Buzzfeed drivel has been center-right or right-leaning is just, as they claim, a narrative.  They insist: there’s nothing there.  We all remember that year, and we also remember the vindication that came the following year: there was not only something there, there was a whole shitstorm there. Continue reading “REVIEW: SJWs Always Double Down – Vox Day (Castelia House, 2017)”

A Not-So-Brief Guide to Tocqueville’s Democracy in America (Part 6 of 13)

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6. Chapter 10 – Vol I Conclusion

The final chapter of Volume I concerns itself with two issues that are inextricably linked: the status race holds in the relations between the peoples on the American continent, and the possible ways in which the dissolution of the Union will eventually take place.  It also marks the conclusion of Volume One of Democracy in America. Continue reading “A Not-So-Brief Guide to Tocqueville’s Democracy in America (Part 6 of 13)”

Try Reading Something Good

So your coworker actually watches television, and you aren’t entirely sure if that’s just so he has something to talk about while waiting for the coffee to brew or if he genuinely enjoys the never-ending torrent of Netflix and HBO original series.  He’s a large man who rarely works out, periodically smells like Cheetos, leans apolitically liberal, and has an annoying and somewhat unmanly inflection in his voice whenever he talks with you, but he’s friendly and he tends to work pretty hard at his job—probably because he doesn’t have any hobbies to speak of except for playing video games and trying to get over the last girlfriend who moved out. Continue reading “Try Reading Something Good”

A Not-So-Brief Guide to Tocqueville’s Democracy in America (Part 5 of 13)

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5. Chapters 7 – 9

Chapters seven and eight detail the use of majority rule in the American nation, while chapter nine deals with the causes of stability that maintain America’s nationhood.  This section concludes a great deal of the thought brought forward in the last several chapters, in particular the relationship between the social state of America versus that of European alternatives, the similarities of political thought between America and its former mother country England, as well as finding the line between a coherent democratic order and a rule of tyranny.  Chapter nine concludes with the harbingers of what is to come in the Twentieth Century: the liberalization of the West and the rise of totalitarian doctrines. Continue reading “A Not-So-Brief Guide to Tocqueville’s Democracy in America (Part 5 of 13)”

A Not-So-Brief Guide to Tocqueville’s Democracy In America (Part 4 of 13)

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4. Part II: Chapters 1 – 6

Part 2 of Volume One begins with Tocqueville briefly noting that up until this section, he has only bothered with explaining the theories and structures of the government and the social state of the American union.  Part 2, he writes, will be concerned with filling these theories with the substance of the power behind its words.  It is the ‘invisible hand’ of democratic function that Tocqueville seeks to explain here. Continue reading “A Not-So-Brief Guide to Tocqueville’s Democracy In America (Part 4 of 13)”

REVIEW: SJWs Always Lie (Vox Day – 2015, Castelia House)

Genre fiction writer, video game designer, web developer, and head of his own publishing house, Vox Day is not a guy that has time to screw around with Leftist idiots seeking to tear down and destroy anything they disagree with.  So naturally, he wrote a book about it—about GamerGate, about the 2015 Hugo Awards, about the Tim Hunts and Brendan Eichs and James Watsons of the world, and most importantly, about what to do when confronted with SJWs in both your personal neighborhood and their own natural habitats. Continue reading “REVIEW: SJWs Always Lie (Vox Day – 2015, Castelia House)”

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