REVIEW: The Age of Entitlement – Christopher Caldwell (Simon & Schuster, 2020)

It’s 2020. We know that America has deep, possibly irreconcilable divisions across moral lines that they’ve severed families. We saw in 2016 that these divisions were not drawn according to political party affiliation, either, as the Republican presidential candidate, propelled into office by shrewd campaigning and a legitimate grassroots support, was hated by his own party for being, among other things, too nationalist. We’re seeing this again this year, as the DNC melts down—again—in order to rally behind a guy so mentally fatigued that he has trouble completing sentences. That said, of course, it’s difficult to observe the trends of the last administration, and the behavior of the opposition party under this one, and not think that our political betters are playing by two different rule books. Continue reading “REVIEW: The Age of Entitlement – Christopher Caldwell (Simon & Schuster, 2020)”

Coming Apart

About a month ago, the Atlantic dropped a bomb entitled Beyond Originalism, which somewhat briefly outlined an integralist approach to ensuring that the Constitution of the United States—the document—isn’t used to subvert the very things it was supposedly written to protect. The piece’s author was Harvard Constitutional Law professor Adrian Vermeule, no stranger to controversy, and I can only assume that the Atlantic decided to publish it in an attempt to make ‘conservatives’ look as authoritarian and as menacingly Catholic as possible. While it scared the liberally-minded conservative dilettantes into quite a barrage of counterpoints and rebuttals—most of which aren’t worth mentioning—the conservatives who actually take the definition at face-value sat back and said, “yeah, okay, that’s a start.” Continue reading “Coming Apart”

REVIEW: The Fr. Lasance Blessed Sacrament Prayerbook [Revisited]

Last year, I reviewed the Blessed Sacrament Prayer Book of Father Lasance, an exhaustive collection of prayers, meditations, and ejaculations compiled by the scholarly priest during his relatively brief time on Earth. I had only just purchased the book at the time and had yet to familiarize myself with its contents, so the review was brief and limited to immediate concerns like readability, size, and general points of note. But a year has passed, and the familiarity I lacked has manifested over a near-daily use of the volume. So here’s the short version of the review:

Get it. Continue reading “REVIEW: The Fr. Lasance Blessed Sacrament Prayerbook [Revisited]”

It’s Not Enough to Just LARP

2016 marked a turning point in American consciousness, characterized by a promise that the future President shouted from a campaign podium: “We will no longer surrender this country or its people to the false song of globalism.” In retrospect, very little seems to have been done on that front, but the point remains: never before had globalism been called out on the national stage by an American president as an evil that must be fought. This wasn’t merely a top-down anthem directed at rubes who didn’t know any better, either. The millions of voters he succeeded in swaying—the people defrauded of their livelihoods by things like NAFTA and free trade, who have been watching their neighborhoods sink into poverty or crime or speak languages more commonly heard overseas—these were the people who bore the brunt of globalism’s damage upon the country. What was inflicted by a corporate-political elite decades ago came home to roost in 2016. Continue reading “It’s Not Enough to Just LARP”

In Search of Ecumenism

“We must go out to meet them where they are.” So goes the theory of liberal ecumenism and evangelization, anyway. As we learn from the epistles and from Acts, we’re encouraged as Catholics to find common ground with alternative belief systems and slowly, deliberately attempt to convince their adherents that ours isn’t just congruent with theirs, but more correct than theirs. Continue reading “In Search of Ecumenism”

Billy Joel’s Piano Man and the Big Lie

All pop music plays into the Big Lie. Hitler famously coined the term, and the general idea is that if you can tell a big enough lie and position it at the heart of a propaganda campaign, people would believe it purely out of the assumption that no one could possibly state something so untrue. And naturally, if they believe that part of the propaganda, then the rest of it follows suit. Continue reading “Billy Joel’s Piano Man and the Big Lie”

The Mandela Effect and the Cult of Scientism

Yesterday, this video about the Mandela Effect popped up in my feed. Unlike most content about the phenomenon, it wasn’t put together by some internet dweeb or fake scientist, but by the CEO of a small, well-established software company that manages inventory and ordering information for food distributors across the country. He prefaces his presentation by emphasizing how long they’ve been in business and exactly what sort of data they deal with, as well as the complications they encounter on a regular basis. Continue reading “The Mandela Effect and the Cult of Scientism”

REVIEW: Infiltration – Dr. Taylor Marshall (Sophia Institute Press, 2019)

It’s not often that I come across a book with about two-hundred fifty pages of content that includes an index and fifty pages of appendices, but that’s what I found I’d ordered when Dr. Taylor Marshall’s Infiltration arrived in the mail last week. It’s a short and very easily-read book, taking only about an afternoon and some change to read through from cover to cover, yet in it, Marshall attempts to tackle the history of the liturgical subversion so rampant in the Church today. Continue reading “REVIEW: Infiltration – Dr. Taylor Marshall (Sophia Institute Press, 2019)”

Against Pride and Against Pride Month

Five years ago, the monumental Obergefell v Hodges case reached its narrow decision, mandating the federal recognition of marriage documents drawn up for pairs of same-sex people engaged in allegedly romantic relationships. Most of us should remember it pretty well. Those that supported it took to the streets waving rainbow flags and loudly proclaiming the message of the sexual revolution: free love, free expression, no consequences, love whom you like. Some of us spent time pouring over the statements by the Justices to see how badly-reasoned the five supporting decisions were. And the rest of the country, more or less ambivalent and ignorant, shrugged their shoulders and acquiesced to the loud mob. Hey, they reasoned, what the gays do in their bedrooms up to them, and if they want to lick the boots of the IRS by getting saddled with the income tax adjustments that come with marriage, they ought to go right ahead. Continue reading “Against Pride and Against Pride Month”

REVIEW: Jordanetics – Vox Day (Castalia House, 2018)

When a professor of psychology at a state-funded university skyrockets into popularity by publicly denouncing a national policy regarding preferred pronouns, he does what most of us would presume to be is career suicide. Even tenured professors have felt the heat from the ardent defenders of political correctness, perhaps even more so now than when Jordan Peterson went viral a few years ago. And in his apparently firm, resolute denunciation, he seemed to be standing on all the same values that commentators just to the right of center have been advocating for in the US for years: liberty, individualism, free speech, et cetera. Continue reading “REVIEW: Jordanetics – Vox Day (Castalia House, 2018)”

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