A Reactionary Cosmology

Like most young reactionaries who survived the public school system and years of university, there comes a point where you question just about everything you were ever taught by a figure of authority. You don’t quite figure out that literally every single thing you ever learned in those institutions was wrong, but that’s only because those institutions had to teach you how to read, write, and add numbers together. Everything else, however, falls under suspicion. Continue reading “A Reactionary Cosmology”

REVIEW: On Grand Strategy – John Lewis Gaddis (Penguin Press, 2018)

Books on strategy comprise a gargantuan field of popular reading.  The stuff of ancient conquests and military theory can certainly be interesting when handled by the right author, and it’s a pretty well-established meme to use military tactical and strategic advice as metaphors for deploying one’s skills in the business world.  It stands to reason, then, that a book on strategy seeking popular sticking-power would need at least two of the following: interesting subject matter, astute and insightful explanation, and easily readable narration. Continue reading “REVIEW: On Grand Strategy – John Lewis Gaddis (Penguin Press, 2018)”

The Political e-Celeb Menace

It’s no surprise that popularity breeds contempt, often from complete nobodies.  Envy is commonly assumed to be the primary driver of this contempt, and all too often, that seems to check out.  But that isn’t always the case.  All forms of popularity are not created equal—a Hollywood actor’s popularity is almost entirely arbitrary, and contempt for his face appearing on billboards across the nation could stem from the enviousness of countless other men failing to be in the right place at the right time and loaded up with the right connections like he was, or it could stem from countless tabloid-published moral failings as Hollywood pretends to operate according to the same moral compass that drives the sane segment of humanity. Continue reading “The Political e-Celeb Menace”

REVIEW: SJWs Always Double Down – Vox Day (Castelia House, 2017)

Rewind for a second.  It’s 2016 again.  Donald Trump is allegedly in last-place during the Republican primaries.  Google has been accused, though as of yet no evidence has actually come forward that would convince the Left, of being so compromised by SJWs that they’re censoring and omitting search results with their engine.  Facebook, also, has been accused of burying conservative articles in the newsfeed.  Twitter’s been kicking people off their platform.  But so far, the fact that nearly every relevant person of interest who has been censored, de-platformed, or buried under cat videos and Buzzfeed drivel has been center-right or right-leaning is just, as they claim, a narrative.  They insist: there’s nothing there.  We all remember that year, and we also remember the vindication that came the following year: there was not only something there, there was a whole shitstorm there. Continue reading “REVIEW: SJWs Always Double Down – Vox Day (Castelia House, 2017)”

Stop Using Ellipses

There is only one plausible reason to use ellipses in your writing: you’re saving space by trimming down a quote in a paper or book.  That’s it.  You can use ellipses in other places, like when you’re writing some sort of bad postmodern thriller and you feel like letting the narrative trail off.  It makes your writing indistinct and vague, and it does nothing to further the mood except in the most superficially obtuse level of a high school creative writing class, but it’s at a least semi-plausible technique to further the story.  As for the former use—well, that’s pretty much why they exist in the first place. Continue reading “Stop Using Ellipses”

On Writing and How to Write, in Brief

Writing is tough.  I’ve been doing it for years, and from experience, I can tell you that only the most superficial elements of it get any easier.  Like any skill or craft, the more you do it, the easier certain technical aspects become; the real art of it, though—the purpose behind each piece—remains just as difficult to develop after fifteen years as it did at first.  Anyone who makes claims to the contrary is either pulling your leg, trying to sell you something, or is a uniquely terrible writer. Continue reading “On Writing and How to Write, in Brief”

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