REVIEW: Infiltration – Dr. Taylor Marshall (Sophia Institute Press, 2019)

It’s not often that I come across a book with about two-hundred fifty pages of content that includes an index and fifty pages of appendices, but that’s what I found I’d ordered when Dr. Taylor Marshall’s Infiltration arrived in the mail last week. It’s a short and very easily-read book, taking only about an afternoon and some change to read through from cover to cover, yet in it, Marshall attempts to tackle the history of the liturgical subversion so rampant in the Church today. Continue reading “REVIEW: Infiltration – Dr. Taylor Marshall (Sophia Institute Press, 2019)”

REVIEW: Jordanetics – Vox Day (Castalia House, 2018)

When a professor of psychology at a state-funded university skyrockets into popularity by publicly denouncing a national policy regarding preferred pronouns, he does what most of us would presume to be is career suicide. Even tenured professors have felt the heat from the ardent defenders of political correctness, perhaps even more so now than when Jordan Peterson went viral a few years ago. And in his apparently firm, resolute denunciation, he seemed to be standing on all the same values that commentators just to the right of center have been advocating for in the US for years: liberty, individualism, free speech, et cetera. Continue reading “REVIEW: Jordanetics – Vox Day (Castalia House, 2018)”

We Don’t Want Your Kind of Books Here

An open letter was recently published on a site dedicated to news and links for children’s literature.  It’s author was a young school librarian, Liz Phipps Soeiro, head held slouched with ideas of social justice and community programming oriented toward children.  That’s hardly newsworthy.  What is worth a mention, however, is the content of her letter: a seemingly polite letter in reaction to the First Lady’s decision to send a bundle of Dr. Seuss books out to the highest-achieving schools in each state. Continue reading “We Don’t Want Your Kind of Books Here”

Reassemble Your Traditions

As things go, tradition should always be honored, respected, and at the very least, considered, before it’s wantonly thrown into a trashcan.  Traditionalists do not have a desire to turn back the clock, as so many of their critics seem to assume; rather, traditionalism seeks only to maintain and remind the hollow men of Modernity that things weren’t always as empty and nihilistic as they are today.  The nihilist would probably agree, but only inasmuch as the crude masses of the past were simply deluded by opiates like religion or, as is still the case today, work.  The philistine, however, would wonder what on Earth you’re talking about.  Medicine and technology are better than at any time in recorded history—the Romans, great as they were, couldn’t even watch cat videos on their phones.  They didn’t even have phones! Continue reading “Reassemble Your Traditions”

A Not-So-Brief Guide to Tocqueville’s Democracy in America (Part 6 of 13)

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6. Chapter 10 – Vol I Conclusion

The final chapter of Volume I concerns itself with two issues that are inextricably linked: the status race holds in the relations between the peoples on the American continent, and the possible ways in which the dissolution of the Union will eventually take place.  It also marks the conclusion of Volume One of Democracy in America. Continue reading “A Not-So-Brief Guide to Tocqueville’s Democracy in America (Part 6 of 13)”

Try Reading Something Good

So your coworker actually watches television, and you aren’t entirely sure if that’s just so he has something to talk about while waiting for the coffee to brew or if he genuinely enjoys the never-ending torrent of Netflix and HBO original series.  He’s a large man who rarely works out, periodically smells like Cheetos, leans apolitically liberal, and has an annoying and somewhat unmanly inflection in his voice whenever he talks with you, but he’s friendly and he tends to work pretty hard at his job—probably because he doesn’t have any hobbies to speak of except for playing video games and trying to get over the last girlfriend who moved out. Continue reading “Try Reading Something Good”

A Not-So-Brief Guide to Tocqueville’s Democracy In America (Part 4 of 13)

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4. Part II: Chapters 1 – 6

Part 2 of Volume One begins with Tocqueville briefly noting that up until this section, he has only bothered with explaining the theories and structures of the government and the social state of the American union.  Part 2, he writes, will be concerned with filling these theories with the substance of the power behind its words.  It is the ‘invisible hand’ of democratic function that Tocqueville seeks to explain here. Continue reading “A Not-So-Brief Guide to Tocqueville’s Democracy In America (Part 4 of 13)”

REVIEW: SJWs Always Lie (Vox Day – 2015, Castelia House)

Genre fiction writer, video game designer, web developer, and head of his own publishing house, Vox Day is not a guy that has time to screw around with Leftist idiots seeking to tear down and destroy anything they disagree with.  So naturally, he wrote a book about it—about GamerGate, about the 2015 Hugo Awards, about the Tim Hunts and Brendan Eichs and James Watsons of the world, and most importantly, about what to do when confronted with SJWs in both your personal neighborhood and their own natural habitats. Continue reading “REVIEW: SJWs Always Lie (Vox Day – 2015, Castelia House)”

A Not-So-Brief Guide to Tocqueville’s Democracy in America: Part 2 of 13

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2. Chapters 5 – 7

Chapters five, six, and seven are concerned more with the details of the law and organization of the American political structure than with general theories as to its governance.  Chapter five concerns the ground-up formulation of the American government, emphasizing the regional autonomy of townships and counties, but stopping short of analyzing the federal government.  Chapter six looks at the judicial system as it is practiced in both general principle and specific case.  Chapter seven is a look at the American political jurisdiction and how it compares to France. Continue reading “A Not-So-Brief Guide to Tocqueville’s Democracy in America: Part 2 of 13”

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