A Not-So-Brief Guide to Tocqueville’s Democracy in America (Part 6 of 13)

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6. Chapter 10 – Vol I Conclusion

The final chapter of Volume I concerns itself with two issues that are inextricably linked: the status race holds in the relations between the peoples on the American continent, and the possible ways in which the dissolution of the Union will eventually take place.  It also marks the conclusion of Volume One of Democracy in America. Continue reading “A Not-So-Brief Guide to Tocqueville’s Democracy in America (Part 6 of 13)”

Try Reading Something Good

So your coworker actually watches television, and you aren’t entirely sure if that’s just so he has something to talk about while waiting for the coffee to brew or if he genuinely enjoys the never-ending torrent of Netflix and HBO original series.  He’s a large man who rarely works out, periodically smells like Cheetos, leans apolitically liberal, and has an annoying and somewhat unmanly inflection in his voice whenever he talks with you, but he’s friendly and he tends to work pretty hard at his job—probably because he doesn’t have any hobbies to speak of except for playing video games and trying to get over the last girlfriend who moved out. Continue reading “Try Reading Something Good”

The American Republic is Unrecognizable

This is getting to be a commonly heard phrase.  “The republic cannot stand with behavior like this in its highest offices,” the conservative commentators barked under the Clinton dadministration.  “The republic is doomed with all these warmongers and invasions,” came the outcry from liberal elite after 9-11.  “The republic will be bankrupt in a few short years,” the lounge-chair conservative economists cried as Obamacare passed.  And now, from the Left, as we’ve come to expect: “the republic is a fascist state run by a giant orange!”  At least they’ve found a taste for subtlety. Continue reading “The American Republic is Unrecognizable”

Quit It with the Statues, Guys

Just up the road here sits the city of Baltimore: population about 620,000 and steadily declining.  It has, according to Wikipedia, the most number of public statues and monuments per capita than any other American city.  But as of the time of writing this piece, the number of those monuments has been dropped by four.  Perhaps some may consider this an insignificant number in comparison to the volume of existing memorials—after all, in the city of monuments, the public square could spare a few of them, right?  That dodges the point, of course, but then again, what is the point?  Why bother tearing down the statues in the first place? Continue reading “Quit It with the Statues, Guys”

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