How Not to Regulate the Culture

Conservatives conceded the culture a long time ago. Everyone knows this, but not everyone can agree on why or how that happened to begin with. We can claim somewhat a-historically that the ‘conservative’ culture of the last century simply evaporated, and that it’s a matter of the ever-changing definition of liberalism graduating the boundaries of what’s socially acceptable by the decade. We could point directly to the movers and shakers of the culturally relevant revolutionary movements that forced particular court rulings and executive mandates on us. We could blame certain groups of people for subverting our media and entertainment. The reality is most likely some convoluted combination of all sorts of factors. Continue reading “How Not to Regulate the Culture”

REVIEW: The Age of Entitlement – Christopher Caldwell (Simon & Schuster, 2020)

It’s 2020. We know that America has deep, possibly irreconcilable divisions across moral lines that they’ve severed families. We saw in 2016 that these divisions were not drawn according to political party affiliation, either, as the Republican presidential candidate, propelled into office by shrewd campaigning and a legitimate grassroots support, was hated by his own party for being, among other things, too nationalist. We’re seeing this again this year, as the DNC melts down—again—in order to rally behind a guy so mentally fatigued that he has trouble completing sentences. That said, of course, it’s difficult to observe the trends of the last administration, and the behavior of the opposition party under this one, and not think that our political betters are playing by two different rule books. Continue reading “REVIEW: The Age of Entitlement – Christopher Caldwell (Simon & Schuster, 2020)”

Coming Apart

About a month ago, the Atlantic dropped a bomb entitled Beyond Originalism, which somewhat briefly outlined an integralist approach to ensuring that the Constitution of the United States—the document—isn’t used to subvert the very things it was supposedly written to protect. The piece’s author was Harvard Constitutional Law professor Adrian Vermeule, no stranger to controversy, and I can only assume that the Atlantic decided to publish it in an attempt to make ‘conservatives’ look as authoritarian and as menacingly Catholic as possible. While it scared the liberally-minded conservative dilettantes into quite a barrage of counterpoints and rebuttals—most of which aren’t worth mentioning—the conservatives who actually take the definition at face-value sat back and said, “yeah, okay, that’s a start.” Continue reading “Coming Apart”

Dude, Immigrants

There are four different caravans making their ways north through Latin America.  Some along for the ride intend to settle in Mexico, while others are in for the long haul: to force entry into the United States.  All total, the figure of migrants numbers close to seven thousand, but that number is likely to fluctuate as some depart the caravans to go home or settle in Mexico, or those that leave their homes to join it.  As it stands, about twenty-three hundred of them have already applied for protection in Mexico. Continue reading “Dude, Immigrants”

How to Hijack Conservatism 101

At one time, the term “neocon” referred to a specific group of presumably-reformed Trotskyites who had migrated away from the anti-Stalinist left.  They had found dissatisfaction with the way the conflict in Vietnam was being handled in the 1960s, and using the Cold War as an impetus, sought to limit the expansion of the Soviet regime through extremely active foreign involvement.  This involvement could have taken the form of minor espionage operations, but don’t be fooled: the neocons of the time were no strangers to advocating for the intervention of foreign affairs with the full might of the United States military. Continue reading “How to Hijack Conservatism 101”

REVIEW: Why Liberalism Failed – Patrick J. Deneen (Yale University Press, 2018)

It doesn’t take a genius to note the decrepit state of modernity (take, for example, this blog).  About as cliché, although slightly more respected, is the growing state of contemporary academia to take aim at liberalism—and not merely the liberalism of the clueless BernieBro bumper stickers and effete Starbucks-intoxicated opinions on veganism, but the legitimate roots of liberalism as characterized by Locke, Mill, Rousseau, and the rest.  The so-called classical liberalism of the nineteenth century, the brand contemporary ‘conservatives’ claim to embrace so well, is undergoing a well-deserved attack by what remains of the academic right. Continue reading “REVIEW: Why Liberalism Failed – Patrick J. Deneen (Yale University Press, 2018)”

The Last Jedi is a Failure, Part 5 – The Mouse Is Hungry

This has been an overlong analysis, but now it finally pays off.  What was the purpose of this film?  Why was it actually made, and why was it made so seemingly incompetently?  What did Disney hope to gain from it all?  Was it just a marketing endeavor?  Was the virtue signalling just the cherry on top?  Not exactly.  The Mouse is a bit more sinister than that. Continue reading “The Last Jedi is a Failure, Part 5 – The Mouse Is Hungry”

ANALYSIS: The Last Jedi, Failure, and How Not to Write a Story (Part 1 of 5)

There are plenty of things wrong with Star Wars: The Last Jedi.  If you haven’t seen it yet, I highly advise you not to.  If you like Star Wars, this film insultingly treats you like a retard and seems to have been written by people who haven’t seen any of the previous eight films that bear the title—not even The Force Awakens.  If you dislike Star Wars already, the film isn’t coherent enough to be appropriate as an attack on the franchise, either.  Worse than being a jumbled, incompetent mess, the film seems to be a joke at the audience’s expense, treating them mostly as idiots too stupid to notice contradictions in what is said versus what is depicted. Continue reading “ANALYSIS: The Last Jedi, Failure, and How Not to Write a Story (Part 1 of 5)”

Another Diatribe About Late-Night Comedy

These people are so bad at their jobs, it’s hard to understand where their audience comes from.  They don’t make jokes, and when they do, they’re more often misses than they are hits.  They aren’t very charming, unless smug pretentiousness passes for charming in this increasingly autistic age of delusional navel-gazing.  And they aren’t even all that easy on the eyes, since they all look like poorly-postured and pasty nerds who share all the same set designers and suit tailors.  Continue reading “Another Diatribe About Late-Night Comedy”

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