Student Loan Crisis or, How I Learned To Stop Worrying and Love the Debt Slavery

The cumulative total of American student loans hit $1.5 trillion earlier this year, spread out across a little over forty-four million people.  According to Forbes, this makes loans for university count for the second highest form of consumer debt in the country, with only house mortgages beating it out.  It should come as something of a surprise to hear that the sum total of all the car loans in the country still can’t even hold a candle to the borrowed expenses of the now mockingly-labeled “higher education” in this country. Continue reading “Student Loan Crisis or, How I Learned To Stop Worrying and Love the Debt Slavery”

The Riddle of Steel: New York Times’ Edition!

Bret Stephens posted an amusing Op-Ed in the New York Times yesterday entitled “Repeal the Second Amendment”.  Bret Stephens, for those who aren’t aware, self-identifies as a conservative, and as is somewhat typical of the NYT op-ed crew who lean Right, he’s a card-carrying Republican who stands firmly on his principles to appeal to the NYT’s Left-liberal Democratic platform in this dangerous, Trump-tocratic, post-Obamanite era.  He is, in other words, one of the typical New York elite: clueless, educated, disconnected, and snobbish. Continue reading “The Riddle of Steel: New York Times’ Edition!”

The American Republic is Unrecognizable

This is getting to be a commonly heard phrase.  “The republic cannot stand with behavior like this in its highest offices,” the conservative commentators barked under the Clinton dadministration.  “The republic is doomed with all these warmongers and invasions,” came the outcry from liberal elite after 9-11.  “The republic will be bankrupt in a few short years,” the lounge-chair conservative economists cried as Obamacare passed.  And now, from the Left, as we’ve come to expect: “the republic is a fascist state run by a giant orange!”  At least they’ve found a taste for subtlety. Continue reading “The American Republic is Unrecognizable”

A Not-So-Brief Guide to Tocqueville’s Democracy in America (Part 5 of 13)

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5. Chapters 7 – 9

Chapters seven and eight detail the use of majority rule in the American nation, while chapter nine deals with the causes of stability that maintain America’s nationhood.  This section concludes a great deal of the thought brought forward in the last several chapters, in particular the relationship between the social state of America versus that of European alternatives, the similarities of political thought between America and its former mother country England, as well as finding the line between a coherent democratic order and a rule of tyranny.  Chapter nine concludes with the harbingers of what is to come in the Twentieth Century: the liberalization of the West and the rise of totalitarian doctrines. Continue reading “A Not-So-Brief Guide to Tocqueville’s Democracy in America (Part 5 of 13)”

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