MASK OFF

It’s another election year, which means, as per the example set last time, the cold civil war in this country heats up yet again. Each time is worse than the last, and with two weeks of riots leaving the downtown region of Minneapolis looking like Falujiah in 2005, we can rest assured that Minneapolis probably won’t be coming back from this. Seattle has a comically titled Capitol Hill Autonomous Zone (CHAZ) which is currently under the dominion of an abrasive, belligerent soundcloud rapper, because he’s the only one who thought to bring a gun. And, the icing on the cake: Pelosi spearheaded an effort to rip down, by congressional authority, more statues of Confederate figures. Continue reading “MASK OFF”

Life Under Occupation

You have gone back in time to the year 1950. You’re on a street corner in Fredrick, Maryland, a relatively small town, at the time, north of the Potomac, south of the Mason-Dixon, and about a twenty minute drive east from Antietam, the site of the bloodiest day in American history which, in 1950, had only happened about eighty-eight years before. The last veteran of that battle, James Hard, wouldn’t die for another three years. He’ll see his eleventy-first birthday before his expiration. Continue reading “Life Under Occupation”

REVIEW: My Prayer Book – Rev. Father F. X. Lasance (1908)

We return again to the work of Father Lasance, continuing our romp through the material of his available in English print. You can find here linked my reviews for Fr. Lasance’s missal and his longer Blessed Sacrament Prayer Book, both of which I highly recommend. My Prayer Book, assembled by Fr Lasance more than a century ago, differs from the larger and more broadly-scoped Blessed Sacrament volume in a number of ways, which we’ll get into below. All in all, however, I do recommend My Prayer Book, though with caveats. Continue reading “REVIEW: My Prayer Book – Rev. Father F. X. Lasance (1908)”

REVIEW: The Fr. Lasance Blessed Sacrament Prayerbook [Revisited]

Last year, I reviewed the Blessed Sacrament Prayer Book of Father Lasance, an exhaustive collection of prayers, meditations, and ejaculations compiled by the scholarly priest during his relatively brief time on Earth. I had only just purchased the book at the time and had yet to familiarize myself with its contents, so the review was brief and limited to immediate concerns like readability, size, and general points of note. But a year has passed, and the familiarity I lacked has manifested over a near-daily use of the volume. So here’s the short version of the review:

Get it. Continue reading “REVIEW: The Fr. Lasance Blessed Sacrament Prayerbook [Revisited]”

Billy Joel’s Piano Man and the Big Lie

All pop music plays into the Big Lie. Hitler famously coined the term, and the general idea is that if you can tell a big enough lie and position it at the heart of a propaganda campaign, people would believe it purely out of the assumption that no one could possibly state something so untrue. And naturally, if they believe that part of the propaganda, then the rest of it follows suit. Continue reading “Billy Joel’s Piano Man and the Big Lie”

The Mandela Effect and the Cult of Scientism

Yesterday, this video about the Mandela Effect popped up in my feed. Unlike most content about the phenomenon, it wasn’t put together by some internet dweeb or fake scientist, but by the CEO of a small, well-established software company that manages inventory and ordering information for food distributors across the country. He prefaces his presentation by emphasizing how long they’ve been in business and exactly what sort of data they deal with, as well as the complications they encounter on a regular basis. Continue reading “The Mandela Effect and the Cult of Scientism”

REVIEW: Infiltration – Dr. Taylor Marshall (Sophia Institute Press, 2019)

It’s not often that I come across a book with about two-hundred fifty pages of content that includes an index and fifty pages of appendices, but that’s what I found I’d ordered when Dr. Taylor Marshall’s Infiltration arrived in the mail last week. It’s a short and very easily-read book, taking only about an afternoon and some change to read through from cover to cover, yet in it, Marshall attempts to tackle the history of the liturgical subversion so rampant in the Church today. Continue reading “REVIEW: Infiltration – Dr. Taylor Marshall (Sophia Institute Press, 2019)”

Against Pride and Against Pride Month

Five years ago, the monumental Obergefell v Hodges case reached its narrow decision, mandating the federal recognition of marriage documents drawn up for pairs of same-sex people engaged in allegedly romantic relationships. Most of us should remember it pretty well. Those that supported it took to the streets waving rainbow flags and loudly proclaiming the message of the sexual revolution: free love, free expression, no consequences, love whom you like. Some of us spent time pouring over the statements by the Justices to see how badly-reasoned the five supporting decisions were. And the rest of the country, more or less ambivalent and ignorant, shrugged their shoulders and acquiesced to the loud mob. Hey, they reasoned, what the gays do in their bedrooms up to them, and if they want to lick the boots of the IRS by getting saddled with the income tax adjustments that come with marriage, they ought to go right ahead. Continue reading “Against Pride and Against Pride Month”

REVIEW: Jordanetics – Vox Day (Castalia House, 2018)

When a professor of psychology at a state-funded university skyrockets into popularity by publicly denouncing a national policy regarding preferred pronouns, he does what most of us would presume to be is career suicide. Even tenured professors have felt the heat from the ardent defenders of political correctness, perhaps even more so now than when Jordan Peterson went viral a few years ago. And in his apparently firm, resolute denunciation, he seemed to be standing on all the same values that commentators just to the right of center have been advocating for in the US for years: liberty, individualism, free speech, et cetera. Continue reading “REVIEW: Jordanetics – Vox Day (Castalia House, 2018)”

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