REVIEW: Jordanetics – Vox Day (Castalia House, 2018)

When a professor of psychology at a state-funded university skyrockets into popularity by publicly denouncing a national policy regarding preferred pronouns, he does what most of us would presume to be is career suicide. Even tenured professors have felt the heat from the ardent defenders of political correctness, perhaps even more so now than when Jordan Peterson went viral a few years ago. And in his apparently firm, resolute denunciation, he seemed to be standing on all the same values that commentators just to the right of center have been advocating for in the US for years: liberty, individualism, free speech, et cetera. Continue reading “REVIEW: Jordanetics – Vox Day (Castalia House, 2018)”

A Mediocre Sense of Evil

This was intended to be a shorter post for the week, as projects and research have taken up most of my time, but it turned out to be about the usual length. Watching the meltdown over the past week over two barely-related topics made me really think about the timing of their breaking: Game of Thrones approaching its humorously absurd conclusion, and the state of Alabama passing what is the strictest American anti-abortion law in living memory. Continue reading “A Mediocre Sense of Evil”

“It’s Not Up to Me.”

“Well, that’s just your opinion, man. We’ll juts have to agree to disagree.”

Sure. We can agree to disagree on the indisputable fact that mayonnaise has no business being on a hamburger. We can agree to disagree that driving a stick shift makes for a more pleasant experience when outside of major cities. We can even agree to disagree over whether Natalie Portman was more attractive in Attack of the Clones than Carrie Fischer was in The Return of the Jedi. Continue reading ““It’s Not Up to Me.””

What is Modernity?

I’ve written a bit about modernity over the past couple of years, and in fact, I think the entire QNUW project at this point could be defined as a reaction against it.  But the concept is a tricky one, because it’s a term for the very air we breathe in contemporary society.  And it’s not something as simplistically defined as “the present day” or even “the present operation of things,” since those would imply that modernity is a definition related to a period of time rather than a term that applies to specific systems of ideologies. Continue reading “What is Modernity?”

Are Video Games Art?

Spend enough time around internet forums and video games and you’ll encounter the same tired pseudo-intellectuals that pretend to philosophize about arts and entertainment.  There is always a trend, no matter the fandom, to take your hobby a little more seriously then it probably deserves.  There isn’t usually anything wrong with that, so long as you don’t go overboard and start calling it something it isn’t or investing unhealthy amounts of time into it.  Hobbies are, after all, hobbies. Continue reading “Are Video Games Art?”

Goodbye, Intellectual Dork Web

This piece was prompted by one of this blogger’s favorite whipping posts: Jordan B. Peterson’s credibility and incomprehensibility.  Those of us waiting for the other shoe to drop have been vindicated, at least until the other-other shoe drops and the entire network of these clowns, Peterson included, are revealed to be part of the very machine they were organized to stand in opposition to.  I don’t think that has happened yet, but rest assured, it will soon enough. Continue reading “Goodbye, Intellectual Dork Web”

Tattoos, Body Modification, and the Modern Interest in Destroying Yourself By Consent

There used to be a time when it was common practice to teach our children how to properly respect our bodies.  Used to be.  Now that respect extends to the farthest frontiers of the term consent, well past the long-rotted fences that cordoned off the brighter pastures of moral guidance and virtue.  The common assumption is that proper respect for the body rests somewhere between the humiliating and derogatory attack on common decency, and the lurid sexuality of wanton lust pushed by corporate interests and characterized by billboards, internet pornography, and the expectations of a sexual culture. Continue reading “Tattoos, Body Modification, and the Modern Interest in Destroying Yourself By Consent”

The Cosmological Proof: A Quick Rundown

While writing the review for Ed Feser’s Five Proofs of the Existence of God, I decided to cut out a large segment I had written concerning the Kalam cosmological argument and its relationship with Aristotle’s First Cause argument.  Feser doesn’t spend much time on the Kalam argument save to mention it briefly in the last chapter of his book, and even then, he spends no time focusing on it.  Since most of what I’ll be discussing here only uses Feser’s book as a jumping-off point, I decided to split it off and make it a post of its own. Continue reading “The Cosmological Proof: A Quick Rundown”

Five Proofs of the Existence of God – Edward Feser (Ignatius Press, 2017)

2017 was a busy year for Edward Feser, having two hot publications drop within six months of each other.  One of them he co-wrote with Joseph M. Bessette on the topic of a Catholic defense of capital punishment, By Man Shall His Blood Be Shed, which I plan on reviewing later this summer.  The other, Five Proofs of the Existence of God, has turned out to be one of the best books of its kind in the field of popular apologetics.  It brings together into one place all of the work in apologetics and metaphysics that Feser has written about before—particularly in The Last Superstition and in various places of Scholastic Metaphysics and Aquinas—while also adding to his repertoire more fleshed out versions of proofs he had hitherto only briefly touched upon in passing. Continue reading “Five Proofs of the Existence of God – Edward Feser (Ignatius Press, 2017)”

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