REVIEW: The Fr. Lasance Blessed Sacrament Prayerbook [Revisited]

Last year, I reviewed the Blessed Sacrament Prayer Book of Father Lasance, an exhaustive collection of prayers, meditations, and ejaculations compiled by the scholarly priest during his relatively brief time on Earth. I had only just purchased the book at the time and had yet to familiarize myself with its contents, so the review was brief and limited to immediate concerns like readability, size, and general points of note. But a year has passed, and the familiarity I lacked has manifested over a near-daily use of the volume. So here’s the short version of the review:

Get it. Continue reading “REVIEW: The Fr. Lasance Blessed Sacrament Prayerbook [Revisited]”

It’s Not Enough to Just LARP

2016 marked a turning point in American consciousness, characterized by a promise that the future President shouted from a campaign podium: “We will no longer surrender this country or its people to the false song of globalism.” In retrospect, very little seems to have been done on that front, but the point remains: never before had globalism been called out on the national stage by an American president as an evil that must be fought. This wasn’t merely a top-down anthem directed at rubes who didn’t know any better, either. The millions of voters he succeeded in swaying—the people defrauded of their livelihoods by things like NAFTA and free trade, who have been watching their neighborhoods sink into poverty or crime or speak languages more commonly heard overseas—these were the people who bore the brunt of globalism’s damage upon the country. What was inflicted by a corporate-political elite decades ago came home to roost in 2016. Continue reading “It’s Not Enough to Just LARP”

REVIEW: Jordanetics – Vox Day (Castalia House, 2018)

When a professor of psychology at a state-funded university skyrockets into popularity by publicly denouncing a national policy regarding preferred pronouns, he does what most of us would presume to be is career suicide. Even tenured professors have felt the heat from the ardent defenders of political correctness, perhaps even more so now than when Jordan Peterson went viral a few years ago. And in his apparently firm, resolute denunciation, he seemed to be standing on all the same values that commentators just to the right of center have been advocating for in the US for years: liberty, individualism, free speech, et cetera. Continue reading “REVIEW: Jordanetics – Vox Day (Castalia House, 2018)”

Let’s Not Abolish the Priesthood

Last week, The Atlantic published a cover story for its June 2019 edition written by James Carroll, an ex-priest of Boomer age with, apparently, a very confused sense of Catholicism. Entitled “Abolish the Priesthood” by whatever flamboyant editor ran with the article, it is one of the best examples of confused Spirit-of-Vatican-II nonsense I’ve read in recent memory. Selective, arbitrary, arrogant, and self-indulgent, Carroll’s diatribe comes across as a man eagerly pushing an agenda on grounds so obviously erroneous that his audience could only be found perusing the pages of The Atlantic. Continue reading “Let’s Not Abolish the Priesthood”

Spotlight: Sayings of the Desert Fathers

When someone utters the term “Christian monasticism,” the Western mind probably conjures up images of dimly-lit temples and Gothic architecture, candles illuminating monks in brown robes as they transcribe ancient texts into medieval tomes, Gregorian chants, and the occasional pillaging and burning by Vikings. While this describes an important aspect of Catholic monasticism during the middle ages, the Christian tradition monks serving God in secluded hermitages extends as far back as at least the third century, beginning in the Egyptian desert west of the Nile and some ways northwest of Memphis. The establishment of Nitria, Kellia, and perhaps most noteworthy, Scetis, marked the beginning of Christian asceticism that, in various forms, has endured even into today. Continue reading “Spotlight: Sayings of the Desert Fathers”

Modernity’s Historical Illiteracy — Ecclesia et Synagoga

We all watched the flames consume the historic spire of Notre-Dame on Monday, burning it down to its skeleton before it went crashing into the roof of the thirteenth-century cathedral. We waited for news about the relics and artwork inside and wondered about the state of the glass in the windows that had managed to survive two world wars, Napoleon, the Revolution, and the Reformation. And when the flames were finally extinguished, we watched with baited breaths as emergency officials picked through the sanctuary to determine the building’s soundness. Continue reading “Modernity’s Historical Illiteracy — Ecclesia et Synagoga”

Assassin’s Creed and the Liberal Narrative

Now I’m going to talk about a video game.

I just completed a run-through of some the old Assassin’ Creed 2 and AC: Brotherhood games that first came out back in 2009.  It’s hard to believe that was nearly a decade ago, considering how the gameplay itself seems only to have aged a few years.  Granted, I played the remastered collection that was released in 2012, so maybe that has something to do with it.

I’m behind the times.  Sue me. Continue reading “Assassin’s Creed and the Liberal Narrative”

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