REVIEW: Why Liberalism Failed – Patrick J. Deneen (Yale University Press, 2018)

It doesn’t take a genius to note the decrepit state of modernity (take, for example, this blog).  About as cliché, although slightly more respected, is the growing state of contemporary academia to take aim at liberalism—and not merely the liberalism of the clueless BernieBro bumper stickers and effete Starbucks-intoxicated opinions on veganism, but the legitimate roots of liberalism as characterized by Locke, Mill, Rousseau, and the rest.  The so-called classical liberalism of the nineteenth century, the brand contemporary ‘conservatives’ claim to embrace so well, is undergoing a well-deserved attack by what remains of the academic right. Continue reading “REVIEW: Why Liberalism Failed – Patrick J. Deneen (Yale University Press, 2018)”

Chinese Catholicism

Last year, it came to be announced that Pope Francis had begun talking with the communist Chinese government over the negotiation of the Church’s presence in the country.  A bit of background: Catholics in China have a tendency to disappear, but sometimes they’re merely imprisoned for life on any number of possible charges.  Religion is not a thing generally looked upon favorably in the PRC, though Xi Jingping’s government does play its understandable favorites; Buddhism and Taoism enjoy a relatively low level of antagonism from the authorities, while just about everyone else could be under threat of  spending their lives behind bars if they aren’t completely cooperative with their secular masters. Continue reading “Chinese Catholicism”

A Not-So-Brief Guide to Tocqueville’s Democracy in America (Part 5 of 13)

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5. Chapters 7 – 9

Chapters seven and eight detail the use of majority rule in the American nation, while chapter nine deals with the causes of stability that maintain America’s nationhood.  This section concludes a great deal of the thought brought forward in the last several chapters, in particular the relationship between the social state of America versus that of European alternatives, the similarities of political thought between America and its former mother country England, as well as finding the line between a coherent democratic order and a rule of tyranny.  Chapter nine concludes with the harbingers of what is to come in the Twentieth Century: the liberalization of the West and the rise of totalitarian doctrines. Continue reading “A Not-So-Brief Guide to Tocqueville’s Democracy in America (Part 5 of 13)”

Rejection of the Secular Order (Rod Dreher – The Benedict Option, Anthony Esolen – Out of the Ashes)

If 2016 proved anything to conservatives, it was that they haven’t been listening. While they’ve argued for economic solutions to inner city poverty rates in districts they don’t even control, a certain administration decided to mandate that boys be allowed to use women’s locker rooms in public schools. While they extolled the values of immigration from behind their gated communities in the columns of The Wall Street Journal, neighborhoods in southern California and Arizona decided to fly Mexican flags above the Stars and Stripes. And while conservative justices developed poor excuses for a misunderstood separation between church and state, gay rights activists sued small business owners into bankruptcy over refusing to make wedding cakes shaped like men’s genitalia. Something, clearly, went horribly, horribly wrong. Continue reading “Rejection of the Secular Order (Rod Dreher – The Benedict Option, Anthony Esolen – Out of the Ashes)”

Conservatism and Its Discontents

The American Right has never been the most organized crowd around.  Uniting a broad demographic of laymen, pundits, politicians, and intellectuals, the term has stood as a sort of catch-all for everything that isn’t expressed in the left’s platform.  That’s how “paleo-conservatives” like Pat Buchanan are grouped under the same wing as neocons like John McCain and Bill Kristol, while all three of them supposedly share platform space with libertarians.  Of course, in reality, if leftism wasn’t as cancerous, insane, and obvious as it is today, these three groups would probably be their own separate political parties.  And if the 2016 election is any indication, that might now just be possible. Continue reading “Conservatism and Its Discontents”

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