In Search of Ecumenism

“We must go out to meet them where they are.” So goes the theory of liberal ecumenism and evangelization, anyway. As we learn from the epistles and from Acts, we’re encouraged as Catholics to find common ground with alternative belief systems and slowly, deliberately attempt to convince their adherents that ours isn’t just congruent with theirs, but more correct than theirs. Continue reading “In Search of Ecumenism”

“Know Thyself.”

These words mark the beginning of practical philosophy—practical reason—which is more often recognized by its more common name: the study of morality. They also probably don the front pages of every self-help book ever written, as they mark what most assume to be the beginning of self-knowledge.

What exactly is self knowledge, though? Is it a perfect understanding of one’s own actions? Of the causes of those actions? The thoughts? Is it exact harmony between one’s thoughts, intentions, motivations, and behavior? If it is any or all of these things, how can it be attained? Continue reading ““Know Thyself.””

Let’s Not Abolish the Priesthood

Last week, The Atlantic published a cover story for its June 2019 edition written by James Carroll, an ex-priest of Boomer age with, apparently, a very confused sense of Catholicism. Entitled “Abolish the Priesthood” by whatever flamboyant editor ran with the article, it is one of the best examples of confused Spirit-of-Vatican-II nonsense I’ve read in recent memory. Selective, arbitrary, arrogant, and self-indulgent, Carroll’s diatribe comes across as a man eagerly pushing an agenda on grounds so obviously erroneous that his audience could only be found perusing the pages of The Atlantic. Continue reading “Let’s Not Abolish the Priesthood”

Spotlight: Sayings of the Desert Fathers

When someone utters the term “Christian monasticism,” the Western mind probably conjures up images of dimly-lit temples and Gothic architecture, candles illuminating monks in brown robes as they transcribe ancient texts into medieval tomes, Gregorian chants, and the occasional pillaging and burning by Vikings. While this describes an important aspect of Catholic monasticism during the middle ages, the Christian tradition monks serving God in secluded hermitages extends as far back as at least the third century, beginning in the Egyptian desert west of the Nile and some ways northwest of Memphis. The establishment of Nitria, Kellia, and perhaps most noteworthy, Scetis, marked the beginning of Christian asceticism that, in various forms, has endured even into today. Continue reading “Spotlight: Sayings of the Desert Fathers”

REVIEW: The Blessed Sacrament Prayer Book of Father Lasance

Last week, we looked at the recently reprinted missal of the Latin Mass that was put together back in 1945 by Fr. Francis Xavier Lasance. I hope to do a post at some point in the future on the life of Fr. Lasance, but for now, we’ll continue reviewing some of his works readily available in English. Today, we’re looking at the largest prayer book he ever assembled, which came to be known as his Blessed Sacrament Prayer Book. Continue reading “REVIEW: The Blessed Sacrament Prayer Book of Father Lasance”

Heroism in the Modern World

As Hurricane Season 2017 has kicked into full swing with Charlie’s devastation and Irma’s impending doom, images of Houston’s floodwaters have been painted across every major media outlet worth its salt.  And rightfully so—the relief efforts deserve as much national attention as they do praise.  For some, it’s proof that even a politically divided landscape still comes together in times of need, as sad a statement as that sounds.  It’s almost as if, due to the poisonous rhetoric flung about by million-dollar news anchors and paper editors, people started to believe that partisan differences between conservatives and liberals had reached the point of lethality among common Americans. Continue reading “Heroism in the Modern World”

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