Coming Apart

About a month ago, the Atlantic dropped a bomb entitled Beyond Originalism, which somewhat briefly outlined an integralist approach to ensuring that the Constitution of the United States—the document—isn’t used to subvert the very things it was supposedly written to protect. The piece’s author was Harvard Constitutional Law professor Adrian Vermeule, no stranger to controversy, and I can only assume that the Atlantic decided to publish it in an attempt to make ‘conservatives’ look as authoritarian and as menacingly Catholic as possible. While it scared the liberally-minded conservative dilettantes into quite a barrage of counterpoints and rebuttals—most of which aren’t worth mentioning—the conservatives who actually take the definition at face-value sat back and said, “yeah, okay, that’s a start.” Continue reading “Coming Apart”

A Not-So-Brief Guide to Tocqueville’s Democracy in America (Part 6 of 13)

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6. Chapter 10 – Vol I Conclusion

The final chapter of Volume I concerns itself with two issues that are inextricably linked: the status race holds in the relations between the peoples on the American continent, and the possible ways in which the dissolution of the Union will eventually take place.  It also marks the conclusion of Volume One of Democracy in America. Continue reading “A Not-So-Brief Guide to Tocqueville’s Democracy in America (Part 6 of 13)”

A Not-So-Brief Guide to Tocqueville’s Democracy in America (Part 5 of 13)

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5. Chapters 7 – 9

Chapters seven and eight detail the use of majority rule in the American nation, while chapter nine deals with the causes of stability that maintain America’s nationhood.  This section concludes a great deal of the thought brought forward in the last several chapters, in particular the relationship between the social state of America versus that of European alternatives, the similarities of political thought between America and its former mother country England, as well as finding the line between a coherent democratic order and a rule of tyranny.  Chapter nine concludes with the harbingers of what is to come in the Twentieth Century: the liberalization of the West and the rise of totalitarian doctrines. Continue reading “A Not-So-Brief Guide to Tocqueville’s Democracy in America (Part 5 of 13)”

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